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Joined: Oct 2006
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Breaking equipment for parts. Have plenty of Ivac P-series syringe pumps at the moment. Bargain-basement prices. Only send out stuff that powers-up and looks OK, but beyond that its definitely a case of caveat emptor, with absolutely no warranties, guarantees or come-backs. Prefer to receive payment by PayPal.

Send your wish list if you want, as hands can be laid on many bits of kit.

Always on the look-out for redundant, surplus equipment. Also manuals, special tools, test equipment and surplus parts. Can collect from within the UK. Payment in cash.

Kaz smile

Joined: Nov 2006
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We also specialize in used equipment, parts etc. Trouble is that there is resistance in the NHS to this method of repairing equipment. Private clinics, vets etc. are more flexible. Overseas, where engineers cannot afford to be so choosy, business is possible. But then one faces problems in getting paid! Margins are always small, despite what some would have you believe. And in most of the markets Im aware of, the low-hanging fruit was plucked years ago! The introduction of eBay has opened up new possibilities, but I sometimes think that dealing in other equipment (computers, consumer electronics, nostalgia, cars even) might not only be more profitable, but less hassle as well. As for this forum, having watched goings on for quite a while, I doubt that its a quick route to trading success (but would love to be proved wrong). It sure aint easy being a Biomed Trader!

But the secret to success is knowledge of your market, and giving satisfaction to your customers (it was ever thus).


The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
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Hi Biomed Trader,

Perhaps you'd be better selling new medical equipment as an agent or actually organising servicing of equipment rather than breaking it up for spares. Many of us are scraping a living doing just that - real entrepeneurs could no doubt build up a lucrative business. The MHRA has advised against "cannibilisation" of equipment for spares, in the past, but I'm not sure what the new recommendations are in the new guidance that's just been published.

It's generally not good engineering practice in any case, in my opinion, if operators and users expectations of servicing are higher. As a member of the public I wouldn't want 2nd-hand spares used on safety-critical equipment under any circumstances and I'm certain that equipment manufacturers wouldn't want their reputations put on the line for the sake of someone who's breaking their old products for parts. Surely there are also legal implications for the sale of spares "sold as seen" and used in equipment that's meant to be serviced as per manufacturers recommendations just like MHRA advises.

Perhaps if you hang-on in there you'll find the MHRA may have "opened the door", so to speak, in their new guidance (it being a little "lighter" and less prescriptive than before). I do find they're generally very sympathetic towards "commercial sensitivities" so maybe you could call them and see what the current policy is towards breaking for spares.

Problem I have is traceability of the spares provided, i.e. whether it's the correct part for the job, whether it works properly, who's removed it and checked it, how old it is, how it's been stored, how long it's been out of use and in what environment, how much use and under what circumstances it's been used/serviced, etc, etc.

More trouble than it's worth, not good practice and not recommended. I'd say that individuals in the breaking game must have lost touch with what's required, in the UK at least, or hadn't really thought through the implications of guidance or the marketing angle properly.

A lot of time the medical applications are safety critical so why should individuals like colleagues and I, in the UK, put themselves, patients and operators at risk if equipment becomes more unreliable after fitting with 2nd-hand spares. Even if it's just a cancellation of a list the consequences can be very damaging these days given the current financial and political climate we are forced to work in.

Joined: Dec 2003
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I would have to agree with Richard here. Using a second hand castor is one thing, using a circuit board or gas regulator from equipment that has been condemned is a totally different issue. Bearing in mind all previous MHRA recommendations and good engineering practice what would happen if the equipment failed? The adverse incident gets reported and investigated and the techical reports get examined and there, in the equipment history is a technical report stating that a second hand part has been fitted! Explain that in the court!
Graham

Joined: Jul 2002
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Where has the equipment come from? Is there a hospital that has just up graded its fleet of syringe pumps and the old ones have been intercepted on their way to the skip/charity donation?
If the above is true, being in possession of stolen goods is an offence.
Would you buy a second hand car from a pseudonym hiding behind a Hotmail email address?
Do you get a service history with all the spare parts and how long is the guarantee?

Would "Khazzaq Waldganger" like to give us some more information? May be I am doing him a dis-service?

I have often been approached by people asking if we had any spare equipment as they were connected with a "charity hospital" back home but could provide no evidence of this hospital when asked. I am therefore very suspicious of second hand equipment.

I also agree with Richard about the morals and legality of using this sort of thing on patients in countries that can afford the proper spares. It is a different matter in the third world where anything is better than nothing.

Robert


My spelling is not bad. I am typing this on a Medigenic keyboard and I blame that for all my typos.
Joined: Dec 2005
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One day the NHS will understand lifecycle costing and see the virtue in replacing equipment before the end of its useful life. Is it not better to sell it while it still has some value rather than being forced to pay for its disposal? The WEEE legislation will, hopefully, bring about this change - the underlying message is, after all, recycle and reuse.
When there is a supply of legitimate used equipment then demand will follow. Perhaps even the NHS will see the attractiveness of rfurbished equipment - all the functionality at 2/3rds the cost (approx.)


Rgds
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Thank you for your comments, fellows. As I mentioned in the beginning, there is resistance within the British NHS to anything that resembles make do and mend. Whether this is good or bad is not for me to say. It's fair enough when your pockets are deep, I suppose. Neither is it my place (apart from being a UK tax-payer) to comment on the massive expenditure incurred by that organisation.

Rest assured that we always operate within the laws (especially, the laws of supply and demand)! Any used parts that pass through our hands has been properly acquired and paid for, usually at public auction.

In the real world, you get what you pay for, Im afraid. If you want a guarantee, you pay for it. If you want a service report, you pay for it. But if you want good quality used spares (ex-equipment) at the lowest possible prices, then these are available too.

Finally, if what we are doing is so bad, how come weve received so many emailed enquiries (all, however, from outside the UK NHS)?


The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
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I don't believe anyone buying 2nd-hand wants to pay the going price for serviceable equipment. Going off what I've heard auctions cough-up for equipment then there's not a significant return for "original user" equipment sellers. You may as well run well-maintained devices until they're no longer supported for spares, accessories or consumables, don't meet clinical needs or they're not worth getting repaired.

At least then the justification for replacement is based upon need and not the commercial necessity to release whatever the residual value is in equipment close to the end of its useful life. It's only agents and manufacturers that are in a position to part-exchange equipment thus give a considerable incentive to replace equipment prior to the end of support, in my opinion.

It would be interesting to know how many of the interested parties (outside the UK/NHS) are in the developed Western world. Quality means different things to different people - particularly with different sets of values, guidelines and legislation.

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perception is everything. Perhaps if you changed your location from "the junkstore" you might get a better response! just an idea.


Rgds
chris
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The Junk Store is what it is. The Biomed Trader is what I am. Why pretend?


The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
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