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Joined: Jul 2002
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Hero
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I do know the difference betwen active and passive tags , it is hard to express toungue in cheek whilst typing. But if a passive tag can be made this small why can an active one not be made a lot smaller and lower powered? Obviously they will be larger than passive tags but they do seem excessivly large.
These current large active tags would not fit well on an ambulatory syringe driver which by its nature travels around the place and gets "stored safely" in drawers.
It is this types of equipment that would benefit from tagging not large patient monitors etc.
Robert


My spelling is not bad. I am typing this on a Medigenic keyboard and I blame that for all my typos.
RoJo #28721 17/03/08 9:19 AM
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Super Hero
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How about something like this? smile


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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Hero
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Hero
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I still think a long length of elestic firmly attached to the equipment library shelving is a useable and cheap solution that needs no extenal power.

Robert

For those with no sense of humour this message was sent with my toungue in my cheeek.

I have just been chatting with a syringe pump company person who says they are seriously looking at building RFID in to their pumps as so many people are asking about it. Well they would wouldn't they if they want a sale. But by us insisting on it, we get around the power/size/emf compatability issues if it is built in from the start.


My spelling is not bad. I am typing this on a Medigenic keyboard and I blame that for all my typos.
RoJo #28725 17/03/08 10:17 AM
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Super Hero
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I believe that RFID tagging will be the "next big thing" for the in-house technical support of medical equipment in UK hospitals. It seems to me like the logical next step forward.

It would be interesting to hear from your contact which protocol etc. they are thinking of using, Robert. If each and every manufacturer goes their own way, and introduces their own "standard", we can just imagine the result! smile

Last edited by Geoff Hannis; 17/03/08 10:19 AM. Reason: The next step.

If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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Novice
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The RFID or Real Time Location System market is still relatively immature. There are several technologies vying for dominance: 433MHz, 2.4GHz, UWB (ultrawide band), infrared, and ultrasound to name the main categories.

It's very difficult to pick technology winners, and that's the main reason why medical device vendors have not built tags into their products.

There seem to be two levels of positioning accuracy requirements in hospitals, zone or area level for basic asset management (where is something), and room level accuracy for advanced asset management (like has that pump been through sterilization), patient and staff tracking.

To date, the best technologies for room level accuracy are infrared and ultrasound. While RF based systems (many of which claim room level accuracy) are good for zone level accuracy.

Besides asset management, some hospitals use RTLS to improve patient throughput in the emergency department and surgery. They can also be used for hospital wide patient flow (especially bed management), observation patient management and infection control.

A big differentiator between many systems, regardless of positioning technology, is whether the receivers are wireless or wired. Pulling power and a network connection (even PoE) to positioning receivers is a big hidden cost of these systems. Vendors like Awarix [url=www.awarix.com]www.awarix.com[/url] have receivers that plug in to wall power outlets like those little room fresheners. Others, like CenTrak [url=www.centrak.com]www.centrak.com[/url] are "lick n stick" battery powered receivers.

As more medical devices become wireless, devices with Wi-Fi radios can be tracked by positioning systems like AeroScout [url=www.aeroscout.com]www.aeroscout.com[/url] and Ekahau [url=www.ekahau.com]www.ekahau.com[/url] without a separate tag.


Tim Gee: Connectologist & Principal at Medical Connectivity Consulting
contact | tim@medicalconnectivity.com - 503.481.2370 | Skype - connectologist
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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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Interesting stuff. My own forecast is that RTLS will take off in the UK, not for anything useful like asset management, but as a way of demonstrating compliance with ever-demanding government patient management "targets" (throughput, indeed). I always used to like to consider the hospital as a "system". It seems that some would have us go beyond that, and treat the hospital as a "factory" (processing plant?). Is this really progress, I wonder? smile


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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Philosopher
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I would have thought that Wifi location would win hands down for zone. Problem with most RFID system is that they are new technology, with Wifi your dealing with existing technology and thus have a better idea on their integration and if they will interfere with equipment.

The thing is it's reported that the number of free IP addresses will soon be depleted and the move to IPV6 is thus more urgent. Even if someone doesn't have more than 17891328 assets (including PC's and printers), if most systems migrate to IPV6 can current devices easily be converted to ipv6?

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Super Hero
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Just in case anybody was wondering:- IPv6. Here's more. smile


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7471008.stm

This could upset the apple cart!!!!!!


Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own.
Kawasaki #31580 25/06/08 12:10 PM
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Philosopher
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Presumably systems that use Wifi wouldn't cause as much problems since there's probably Wifi systems already in immediate vicinity and if it was a problem we would have heard by now!

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