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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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I think he's still a bit worried about Acorn catching on. smile


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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Huw Online Content
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Huw #35650 11/12/08 6:19 PM
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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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How about this for a Connection (a point in history from which things have never been quite the same)? smile

Secondly, here is a (partial) list of machines that were based around the 6502 processor.


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Master
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Now this is as classic as you can get. It must of been one of the earliest portable computers ever made wink


It is better to be reactive than radioactive...
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Super Hero
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Originally Posted By: Geoff Hannis
... I had the unexpected privilege of meeting a gentlemen, who (over twenty years ago, and with a team of mates) built what I can only describe as a "clone" of the BBC Micro (actually he/they made forty of them). The surviving example lives in his garden shed, and (at first glance) could be mistaken for an Acorn Atom (the predecessor to the BBC Micro that had so impressed the BBC Computer Literacy Project people). That was because the function keys were grey, rather than the familiar red. But upon closer inspection, I could see that the BBC-like casing was made of fibre-glass. And then, when the lid was lifted ... guess what? The board inside was definitely "home grown". It was nothing like the usual Beeb. Brilliant!

Just in case there were any doubters (?) ... see this link! smile

In similar vein, I can't remember if I've linked to this one before, but you'll find some very "interesting" kit shown here.

Attached Images
Home made 1.jpg (33.39 KB, 1090 downloads)

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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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OK, here's today's "gem".

Why were the early hard-drives called "Winchesters"? Well, the preferred version is that the first device IBM produced using this technology had two platters, each with a capacity of 30 MB. The product was called the "3030", and by a kind stroke of fate this was also the name of an early lever-action rifle manufactured by Oliver Winchester (subsequently famous for the Model 73 that helped win the Wild West).

Less romantic chroniclers will point out that IBM happened to have a factory in the New Hampshire town of Winchester.

Which version do you prefer? smile


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Super Hero
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Here's today's essential reading! smile


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Super Hero
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OK, here's today's bulletin. Of course there were no computers about when I was at school (all that came twenty years later), but today I'm playing around with the Archimedes and A-series Acorn machines for the first time.

Even the standard A310 is brilliant for its day. Evolving onwards from the good old BBC Model B (and Master), Acorn did the sensible thing (skipping 16-bits) by jumping straight to their 32-bit ARM processor. Clever stuff. RISC OS2 from 1988 is the one I'm looking at (I still reckon that Arthur is a much better name for a computer operating system)! But also a pre-Windows WIMP "desktop"!

That A4000 is really nice! RISC OS3 from 1992. A very versatile machine. Ctrl+Shft+F12. Kids who had all that available were just so lucky!

Then there's the A5000. More of the same. Who needs a PC? Especially if you've also got the MEU? The Multimedia Expansion Unit ... which had a CD-ROM drive, SCSI connectors, and various audio outputs. And all back in the early '90's, remember. smile

What do they have in the schools today, I wonder? Not British kit, that's for sure. frown


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Super Hero
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I'm still working my way through my pile of Acorn A-series boxes (giving them the "once over", as it were). This has been my first excursion into this line of kit, and I must admit to being impressed with it, especially considering when the stuff was made (late '80's and early '90's). I love to see kit that is cleverly designed and nicely made. And where else would you find computers with VLSI chips with names like Albion, Anna and Arabella? A real touch of class, surely. But, there again, it is British after all! smile


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Master
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Geoff

There's a ZX81 plus 16K RAM pack up for sale on ebay at the moment, finishes Tuesday. Starting bid £1.99!

Dicky


Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill.
Bullsh*t and brilliance only come with age and experience.
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