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The Perfect Toolkit
#3825 20/11/05 10:29 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 14,200
Likes: 16
Super Hero
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Super Hero
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 14,200
Likes: 16
A few months ago my life-long collection of tools and test equipment were liberated for use by others; I can only hope that some deserved tech is now making good use of by beloved stuff.

Moving on, I'm now in the process of slowly re-building my stock of tools, but this time around I shall need to be more focussed and only buy the tools I actually make use of. Cheaper that way too.

Some years ago I started to make up what I called (for want of a better term) a "minimal toolkit". This was a day-pack (small back-pack) containing a minimal but reasonably comprehensive set of tools, the idea being to be able to tackle most jobs from this kit. It contained, for instance, adjustable spanners rather than spanner sets, and a butane-powered soldering iron to be able to work in "the field", 1/4 inch hex bit sets, reversible screwdrivers etc. I'm sure you get the picture. And before someone starts moaning, in principle I am a great advocate of using the correct tool for each task - but here I'm talking about working on the go, as lightly loaded as possible, not back in the (fully equipped, we hope) workshop.

So what I'm interested in hearing about now is - assuming that we're talking about working away from the workshop, out in the departments and wards, and off-site, how do you organize your tools? How do you carry them around? Satchel, day-pack, brief-case style toolkit, traditional toolbox, shoulder bag, stuffed in your pockets, canvas toolbag, whatever? Or do you visit the job first, and then go back to pick up the tools you need? Also, do you make up your own kit(s), or simply rely on ready-made sets purchased from ... whoever?

If anyone has the time, how about listing the contents of the perfect toolkit (as long as you can handle the general ridicule bound to result)? wink

Lastly, what about service consumables? Give us your perfect list of aerosols, tapes, cable ties etc. that you regularly lug around, and how do you carry them?

We'll leave the topic of the "ideal biomed cart" for another day, and later we'll move on to the "ideal biomed service vehicle" (car, estate car, motor-bike, on foot public transport, van etc.)! smile


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3826 20/11/05 6:48 PM
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 77
Adept
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Adept
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 77
Geoff,
You only need 2 items in your perfect travelling emergency toolkit.
1/WD40
and
2/Gaffer tape.

If it is stuck and shouldn't be - use 1.

If it isn't stuck and it should be - use 2
Problem solved smile

Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3827 20/11/05 8:14 PM
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 243
Master
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Master
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 243
Try baling twine. This seems to be the farmers perfect toolkit/fixall. Have seen it used for everything from repairing tractors and land rovers etc. to hanging gates.


Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill.
Bullsh*t and brilliance only come with age and experience.
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3828 22/11/05 7:05 AM
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 71
Scholar
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Scholar
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 71
Hi Geoff,
There is no perfect toolkit that can fit in a carrying toolbox. We usualy carry a pair of screwdrivers, - and +, tweesers, and AVO meter. After visiting the job, if it requires any other tools, and usualy it doesnt, we walk back to the workshop and get it or have someone bring it to you. I insist on the staff to give me as presice info on the problrm as thay can so I can determine which tools to bring along. If it is a lab problem I have a box with tubings and electrodes, tweesers and cutters ready for the job. cheers Milan

Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3829 22/11/05 8:13 AM
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 22
Dreamer
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Dreamer
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 22
Chris,

You must be forgetting some other essentials:

1/ Sky-hooks
2/ Tube of elbow-grease
3/ Bucket of steam

Oh yes and of course ... a long wait, sorry weight !


The "answer" is of course 42
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3830 22/11/05 11:27 AM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,020
Hero
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Hero
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,020
Sleek or Micropore. It is light, readily available and easy to carry.
....Well it works as a fix-all for the nursing staff. laugh
Robert


My spelling is not bad. I am typing this on a Medigenic keyboard and I blame that for all my typos.
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3831 22/11/05 1:07 PM
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 163
Mentor
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Mentor
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Posts: 163
I think the general rule is if the tool can not do two jobs, its taking up too much space.
Scott.

Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3832 22/11/05 3:27 PM
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,020
Hero
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Hero
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,020
Swiss Army knife and a Leatherman it is then.

I actually used to carry a Leather man around on my belt and found it very useful at times. If you were stopped on the ward for a "while your here" job and a screw just needed tightening or you needed to get something undone to take it back, it saved a double journey to the workshop.
And the department paid for it!!

Robert


My spelling is not bad. I am typing this on a Medigenic keyboard and I blame that for all my typos.
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3833 22/11/05 5:15 PM
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 173
Mentor
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Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 173
Don't they pay for all your tools then?

I have two full kits, one in the lab and one in the car. Most of these are routinely replaced as they wear out. I also have a Gerber multitool on my belt aside a Winchester lock knife and a maglight.. My three mto3's are equally well equipped!

Any special tools we need, we get too, cos we are 'hands on' with everything except that oddball physio. gear and suction (yuk), as its cheaper than service contracts! BTW, where's my AFC7 at?

..buy my own?? pah! the very thought....


5.7L V8 Corvette.. Doing my bit to keep our summers warmer!
Re: The Perfect Toolkit
#3834 23/11/05 11:43 AM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 188
DAS Offline
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Mentor
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 188
Quote:
Originally posted by RoJo:
Sleek or Micropore. It is light, readily available and easy to carry.
....Well it works as a fix-all for the nursing staff. laugh
Robert
Can of label remover for the above.


Never under-estimate the predictability of stupidity
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