EBME Forums

Hospital Dress Codes

Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Hospital Dress Codes - 22/01/05 4:44 PM

There may be a need to consider colour-coding of scrub suits (or "theatre clothing"). Operating theatre staff are supposedly not allowed to leave the OR suite in scrubs (and, of course, no-one is allowed to enter the suite without first changing into scrubs). However, other scrub-suit wearers (eg, A&E staff) are often to be seen roaming around the hospital (taking lunch in the canteen, and even outside the hospital, getting off the bus, crossing the road - I've seen it all with my own eyes). There is a danger that such a person could wander right into the OR without being challenged. Could there be a case, then, for OR staff proper and visitors to the OR suite to have a scrub suit of different colour to the others, so that interlopers may be readily identified and scrub discipline maintained?

Perhaps some of you manager-types could think about raising this issue? smile
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 22/01/05 5:00 PM

What about the dress codes within the Biomed/EBME (…whatever) departments? It is normal practice (for some perverse reason, no doubt) for the head honcho to wear a tie. But “what about the workers”?

Should we be taking a lead from the young doctors I have seen? The young men wearing “scruff order” and the young ladies wearing what can be called, I suppose, “casual clothing” (you know they’re doctors by the stethoscope dangling from their necks, of course).

What do we like to wear these days, guys? I have seen techs wearing ties. I have seen techs wearing polo shirts with a nice logo or department name on the breast. Overalls, dust coats, white coats. I have seen T-shirts and jeans (…plus a mixture of all of the above and more). I haven't seen track-suits yet, though. There has been a lot of talk about “projecting a professional image”, so what about appearance? Does it matter at all these days? (…haircuts, beards?). smile
Posted By: Roy

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 22/01/05 10:53 PM

String vest and a thong always gets a good response. boggle
Posted By: Tony Dowman

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 23/01/05 9:55 AM

I believe that Standards must be maintained, if you turn up on a Ward looking like a scruff, you,ll get treated like one !! smile
Posted By: Roy

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 23/01/05 9:08 PM

Presentation is an important part of professionalism. You have to look the part for people to take you seriously. I'm against uniforms - after all, you don't see doctors wearing them !
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 5:31 AM

To be pleasant, efficient and tidy demonstrates your self-respect. The seasoned first-line tech or service engineer should aspire to be affable, competent, diligent, equable and tactful (look them up!). Such personal characteristics set us apart from the rabble, and (in my opinion at least) are far more important than academic qualifications (…got to keep on banging that drum!). All that should be a given, surely?

But what I was looking for in this topic was feedback about standards of dress. What is the norm these days? Personally, I favour the “designer polo shirt” approach. Practical, and smart enough for our line of work. smile
Posted By: techman

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 8:57 AM

I am of the opinion that it should be 'smart casual', ie no jeans, trainers etc., although a uniform approach (shirt or equivalent with dept name and suitable strides) would be an ok approach. White coats (which I've seen in some places) are naff.

Personally, I do wear a tie (sadly, on the odd occasion that I forgot one I felt neckid).
Posted By: RoJo

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 9:02 AM

Imagine you are a patient lying in bed not knowing wheat is going on a a bloke comes to fiddle with the equipment that is looking after you. I think that a clean tidy professional image would do a lot to reassure the patient. Shirt and tie if you want but not a logo emblazened t-shirt and ripped jeans. Many clothes can be smart if you try it is just a matter of confidence and attitude.
We have different uniforms for different technician groups who are patient based, our renal and ventillator technicians are in marroon.
Tough now there are so many slight variations on a uniform that I think visitors and patients need an identification chart. We have three shades of blue with three different coloured piping on them. I do not know what everyone does.
It is not the actual clothes that count but that way they are worn.
Robert
Posted By: Simon Bennett

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 11:49 AM

I think us military people have it quite easy on this problem. No need to worry which trousers to put on in the morning! Nothing beats the 'stand out factor' of smart military uniform in a mixed NHS/MOD hospital.
Posted By: Dave H

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 12:49 PM

The problem I have with the polo shirt is we come under the "Facilities" banner.

The Estates guys already wear polo shirts.

Unless the Trust invests in a different colour polo shirt, the patient who sees, one moment, the guy departing the WC after unblocking the "Richard III's" is the same guy the next moment coming to work on his patient circuit, will not see a difference.

Only their perception as we know the roles are different, but does it fill them with confidence.

Not demeaning the sanitation engineer but it will be looked upon as the same role.
Posted By: leonius

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 1:21 PM

Here goes it will sound a bit like a third world shopping list though
Light blue short or long sleeve shirt
Dark blue trousers
Black shoes steel to caps anti static (not clod hoppers)
White coat for clinical clean areas (ICU) but not Theatre
Theatre is a bit of a bone for contention; many times I’ve mentioned that different types of staff should dress differently but as of yet only theatre porters wear white
Everyone else wears blue and white shoes/clogs
For really dirty jobs Green boiler suit white hardhat
Posted By: RoJo

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 2:19 PM

HARD HAT!!!! eek
Do they throw things at you if they do not work,Leonius?
Or is your job a little more that plain medical electronics?
Robert
Posted By: Tony Dowman

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 8:17 PM

Maybe its for protection from the Richard IIIs that Dave mentioned laugh laugh wink
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 24/01/05 8:28 PM

As you must know, Tony, in some parts of the world, biomeds are often to be seen wearing scrub suits as their normal “uniform” (yes, even in the workshop). Could this, then, be the answer we are looking for? smile
Posted By: KM

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/01/05 12:57 PM

Those that know me will be aware of my anti tie stance. Apart from a personal dislike of the affore mentioned garment I dont think it makes pepole look any smarter or authoritive, its all in the mind.
Some people wear suits and ties for everything and they dont look any more smart than the bod who wears clean and tidy casual clothes, in fact some might think that people who wear uniformaty type clothing may lack personal image thats why they follow others (just an opinion right or wrong?).
As for the dress code here we have a mix of tie with suit, tie with shirt, no tie I think all our staff have equal smartness and all are capable of displaying the brain power to dress themselves without the need for militarian uniformaty.
Posted By: leonius

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/01/05 1:25 PM

The hard hat is for working in maintenance corridors or on the roof.
P.s maintenance corridors are used for nurse call, hospital radio and data services between wards.
Roof activities include aerial erecting testing and maintenance Inc satellite and inter hospital laser link.
Some of the older parts of the hospital have been here since the thirties and access corridors are more like tunnels.
Posted By: Martyn Evans

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/01/05 4:08 PM

We have been informed that we should wear shirt, tie and smart trousers but no 'chinos'. We are issued with safety shoes both for theatre (white) and other location work. Our Works Dept wear polo shirts or shirts and sweatshirts with the Trust Logo on the chest.
Posted By: Tony Dowman

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/01/05 4:10 PM

Sounds Good to me
Posted By: Mark.E

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/01/05 6:04 PM

When I was a biomed the dress code was always set by the manager..So no arguments please?

But shirt and tie is a good start,.. though I dont know why chino's aren't allowed..I wear them ..LOL
Posted By: Mike Wood

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 26/01/05 12:13 PM

I'm definitely with the smart dress/professionalism brigade. Guess I'm a natural tie-wearer (Latin geekus grosso)

However, when I used to work in/on/for our CCU I wore scrubs, purely because the unit was so warm, and scrubs really are soooo comfortable to work in!
Perhaps we should look at getting some scrubs with PCBs printed on 'em - that'd look professional, eh???
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 10:02 AM

It seems that they're catching up with me, at long last. Now, what about ties? smile
Posted By: John Stewart

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 10:42 AM

Ties? Unless tucked neatly inside a wolly tank-top ala open univesity lecturer style they are not recommended. The tendency for ties to get stuck on all sorts of bits when peering into the abys of some murky instrument with god knows what lurking inside it is not to be dismissed lightly. (Been there done that!) laugh
Posted By: Kawasaki

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 10:47 AM

"It also advises healthcare staff in England against wearing a tie during clinical work."
Posted By: PaulKWJ

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 10:58 AM

I think we should wear a (Daz washed) white T-shirt with a collar and tie drawn on it!
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 10:58 AM

Indeed it does, Kawa.

So then, John, is this our Policy No.2 ? smile
Posted By: John Stewart

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 11:04 AM

Originally Posted By: Geoff Hannis
Indeed it does, Kawa.

So then, John, is this our Policy No.2 ? smile


Sounds good to me. grin
Posted By: John Stewart

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 11:13 AM

Originally Posted By: Kawasaki
"It also advises healthcare staff in England against wearing a tie during clinical work."


Was this why in days of old medical consultants always seemed to wear bow ties? smirk
Posted By: Dicky

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 12:15 PM

Some of ours still do. smile
Posted By: John Stewart

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 12:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Dicky
Some of ours still do. smile

What about yourself then Dicky? You do know that a dicky bow is a bow tie by another name! smilewink
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 1:30 PM

In one place I was at, a guy I was working with started a campaign against shoe laces (on the grounds that they dragged about through the mire, and then carried it into the building). Maybe he had a point. But, there again, he was an architect! smile
Posted By: Jonathan Wells

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 3:39 PM

We have uniform here, blue short sleeved shirt with "Clinical Engineering" and black trousers. We are issued with the shirts but not trousers ( too many different waists and inside legs! )

By co-incidence, the trousers I'm wearing today have torn and is now showing the back of my right thigh blush These were issued to me 6 years ago!!!! Can't wait to get home!
Posted By: Dicky

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 4:09 PM

John
I do indeed know what a dicky bow is.Personnaly I favour an open neck short sleeve shirt.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 4:39 PM

I've been watching this thread with interest, especially as when I was working as an Agency Tech I was often being pressed to wear long-sleeved shirt and a tie. When I was much younger, and perhaps more compliant, I used to grudgingly go along with the status quo (mainly on the grounds that "they" were the client, and it was what they wanted). They used to insist on grounds that it looked more "professional", by the way.

Although I rarely do agency work these days (let’s just say that I’ve become a bit more choosey about what I’m prepared to do), when I have taken on such tasks during the last few years I’ve resisted any notion of conforming to the shirt and tie code. In fact, I don’t even own a tie these days.

Lately I’ve made it a condition. If I can’t wear my usual black multi-pocketed trousers, together with short-sleeved polo shirt (or similar, if they have their own in-house version), both of which I regard as practical and appropriate, then I’m not coming! "Professional" or not, I find that if they really want you (ie, they want the work done), the rules get waived.

It would take £ 40 k a year for me to put on a suit and tie nowadays. And I can see that being on offer any time soon! smile
Posted By: John Stewart

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 17/09/07 5:08 PM

Originally Posted By: Dicky
John
Personnaly I favour an open neck short sleeve shirt.


Me too Dicky! smile
Posted By: Scott Barlow

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 21/11/07 1:35 PM

Personaly i have a problem with ties!
I feel that they are dangerous.
We have been issued with shirts and polo shirts with the company name on, but i do not feel as smart in the company shirt as i do in my own!!

I do think that the polo shirt (if worn with real pants;-)) looks quite smart, get a different colour with a logo for your department.

Does anyone get issued with safety shoes?
Posted By: DarloSteve

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 21/11/07 2:38 PM

Yes, effectively we do (medical gas cylinder handling is one reason that comes to mind).
Posted By: Lee S

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 21/11/07 4:00 PM

And Operating Tables

Lee
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 16/02/08 5:49 PM

Only today a guy was saying to me that if I wanted to work with him (which I don't, particularly), I would need to fork out for a suit and tie (now I don’t, for sure)! He's talking about servicing dental equipment for pity's sake! You'd think that a guy who has known me for 28 years would have wised up a bit since then, wouldn't you?

Perhaps these "bosses" would be happier if they found me one day with the damned tie wrapped around the lathe, pedestal drill, ... or whatever. Maybe if they got off their fat butts occasionally and did some real work themselves, they would realize what appropriate work clothes are (and are not)! smile
Posted By: Anonymous

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 16/02/08 6:20 PM

How about investing in a one-piece overall Geoff? You could ditch the jacket and then work safely with the coveralls on. Plus you could then claim tax-relief for the overalls, steel-toe-cap shoes and 3-piece if it's a requirement to wear one - change at the customers expense, eh?

Seems, to me, like a trivial reason not to use your skills. Unless you like the relative freedom of contract work and staying mobile that is. Incidentally I've been wondering why you don't use your IT skills to develop some training packages and go freelance doing training and stuff?
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 16/02/08 6:35 PM

Actually, Richard, that's more or less what the guy suggested:- "Turn up in your suit and tie, then get changed to do the work" (followed by the reverse process later on). In fact, it's all the driving around that I'd rather avoid, if truth be told.

But "trivial reason"? No, more like a matter or principle as far as I'm concerned. And yes, I do like the relative freedom of contract work, as you put it. In fact I quite "enjoy" the exposure I get to the various machinations of the hospital biomed sheds I encounter. Plus the opportunities it provides for me to "spread the word" (... according to Geoff Hannis, that is)!

Regarding your last point, I like to think of myself (as you do, I believe) as a hands-on kind of guy, and feel that I'm making the best contribution I can by simply working on the kit! smile
Posted By: bcarlisle

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 18/02/08 8:54 AM

Have you tried Matalan, get the loudest suit going and wind the muppet up.

Most people who wear suits dont want to get them dirty anyway so I dont see the logic. Put a muppet in charge and all you get is clown ideas.
Posted By: Glyn

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 18/02/08 2:03 PM

I think the short sleeve shirt and trousers look is the best. No tie dangling dangerously into something it shouldn't and no sleeves to get caught on anything (not to mention dirty).
It looks smart enough and is comfortable to work in.
A person who dresses in a suit or shirt and tie just doesn't look right crawling around on the floor looking round for that dropped screw!
Posted By: Mark Radbourne

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 18/02/08 5:06 PM

Don't drop it then! Or have a discrete supply of spare screws to hand. Not that I have, you understand. smile

Some years ago we stopped wearing ties for the reasons given previously. We now usually wear company branded polo shirts or shirts or very occasionally just plain shirts, with the sleeves turned up if relevant. They look very professional if worn with smart trousers.
Mark
Posted By: 60 Degrees North

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 19/02/08 1:41 AM

Although wearing a tie makes you look the part, they very rarely get washed and are therefore a contamination hazard. They do get trapped in machinery very easily so need to be tucked away.

I prefer to wear an open shirt in the lab and don the tie for meetings or "dress" occasions, ie when the press are about.

If you are worried about patients or other staff not knowing who you are then you should show your ID badge. This is compulsory in our gaff.
Posted By: RoJo

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 19/02/08 8:14 AM

Bring back turn-ups on trousers. If ever you dropped a screw or washer it was the first place to look.

Younger ones on the forum:
Ask your father what a turn-up is or look at a black and white film (Or ask Geoff H). smile
Robert
Posted By: John Sandham

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 19/02/08 8:46 AM

Pull up a sandbag, .... wink

When i was in the forces (Eons ago) we were allowed to choose between wearing an open neck dark blue shirt, or a light blue shirt with a tie.

Whilst working for the NHS, The men I have worked with always worn ties. I think that ties look smarter, but on a hot summer day can be uncomfortable. Maybe more choice is required. Female technicians are able to choose how they want to dress. Maybe more flexibility would not be a bad thing. smile
Posted By: Jonathan Wells

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 19/02/08 8:55 AM

Originally Posted By: 60 Degrees North
Although wearing a tie makes you look the part, they very rarely get washed and are therefore a contamination hazard. They do get trapped in machinery very easily so need to be tucked away.


Before we were issued with uniform about 8 odd years ago, we used to have to wear a tie and for the reason given above I only used ONE tie for work! That one got pretty tatty in the end!
Posted By: DAS

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 25/02/08 2:50 PM

Originally Posted By: John Sandham
Pull up a sandbag, .... wink

When i was in the forces (Eons ago) we were allowed to choose between wearing an open neck dark blue shirt, or a light blue shirt with a tie.


And we always chose the dark blue, so as not to be associated with clerks & shelf stackers.

Used to wear a tie all the time, but now keep one & a jacket in my office for meetings, otherwise it's open neck for me. Too many risks in our workshop & with equipment in general.
Posted By: nikiforos

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/06/08 10:08 AM

I aggree that a person should look as profesional as possible. A shirt or a polo shirt with trousers, at least no blue jeans, is a respectable uiform to be called.
On the other hand i have seen technicians and field engineers in various hospitals that they get away with it by wearing the so called profesional uniform, shirt-tie-trousers-black shoes, in the most filthy way possible.
And i have this question, does this look profesional? But i know it gets away because it foolfills the standards! Which standards? If i have a trouser that is dirty with ripped pockets i am sure i will not be told off for my dress code.
but does this really makes sense?
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/06/08 10:35 AM

Quote:
On the other hand i have seen technicians and field engineers in various hospitals that they get away with it by wearing the so called profesional uniform, shirt-tie-trousers-black shoes, in the most filthy way possible.


Why do I think "Columbo"!

So somewhere between Columbo and Francis the sky-news weatherman! grin

Ed
Posted By: KM

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/06/08 2:52 PM

Ahh.
How does all this tie or no tie.
Short sleeves or not.
Suit or not.
fit in with the Bare below the elbows campaign?
Weve been told no ties, no sleeves below the elbows in any clinical envoirenment. And no watches / rings etc (single wedding band accepted)
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/06/08 3:19 PM

Where pretty much the same Karl, we have the option to wear scrubs which most of us do! Oh and the occasional flippers when entering the renal workshop!

Ed
Posted By: Chris Watts

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/06/08 9:08 PM

Has anybody's dress code policy actually been updated since the Bare below the elbows campaign came in?
Posted By: KM

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/06/08 6:47 AM

Yes ours
Posted By: D.O.A

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/06/08 8:31 AM

I find short sleeves better anyway, when I used to have long sleeves I used to spend half the day rolling them up! Not to happy not wearing a watch though....how do i know when Tea break is coming!!
Posted By: KM

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/06/08 9:07 AM

I wonder if you can get away with wearing a watch on grounds that it effects your balance and therefore health if youve worn one for so long.
laugh
Posted By: Joe Benzini

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/06/08 5:37 PM

If our new boss has anything to do with dress code we will all be back to white coats. Reasons: They get you noticed, more professional,it protects your clothes and sets you aside from ordinary joe public.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/06/08 9:19 PM

It sounds like I am "ahead of the curve" after all! I haven't worn a watch (or any unnecessary nonsense like rings etc.) for more years than I care to remember. Why would anyone need to? (... the watch kept stopping, and the ring caught - painfully - on stuff when my hands were groping around inside bits of kit). And, as for for long sleeves, and ties ... well, don't even ask!

Sorry Joe, but it sounds like you've got problems there, Mate. Do you need me to visit to do a bit of mentoring before things get too far out of hand? If you must wear lab coats, I would go for blue. We are not clinical staff, and it is misleading (unethical?) to suggest otherwise. Unprofessional, in fact. smile
Posted By: Darth Welder

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 6:38 AM

ninjaYou lot are lucky - try wearing this gear and repairing medical equipment!
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 6:57 AM

"Been there, done that" Darth ... and got the medal to prove it! smile
Posted By: Allan H

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 8:00 AM

I must admit I do favour shorts sleeves ,no tie etc. The shirt with the organisation's logo and department embroidered on the breast to signify that you are a staff member & waht department you belong to. If protective clothes should be worn then apron,gloves, facemask if required, should be part of standard procedure when deling with possible contaminated equipment.

How many docs & consultatnts do you see walking about with a white coat on. As far as I'm aware the "white coat" is blamed for the transmission of infection anywy and should be discarded in the bin along with other antiquities that we seem to hang on to.
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 9:09 AM

Oh so true! Well put!
White coats are an embarrassment to the profession, I believe the term 'Muppet' springs to mind!
We're supposed to be respected! Not scoffed at!

Ed
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 9:19 AM

There's nothing wrong with white coats per se. They are a traditional and universally recognised symbol for "doctor"! Patients often expect the doctor to be so attired (perhaps because they would otherwise be distracted by poor / weird / unconventional / whatever dress sense). They protect the doctor's clothing, and show up readily enough when "soiled" (blood-splattered, etc.). My point, however, is that we are not doctors (or, for that matter, laboratory technicians). smile
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 9:33 AM

Totally agree Geoff!

Ed
Posted By: Darth Welder

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 10:46 AM

laugh That was a good link Geoff - I may be of to the darkside soon if it all goes well, I will keep you informed on my progress!

DW - The Darkside is Very Tempting
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 12:13 PM

Of course, the sad thing is that many of those regiments are no longer on parade, as it were.

But don't worry, Darth, the depleted ranks of the Dark Side are always ready to welcome reinforcements! smile
Posted By: Chris Watts

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 12:28 PM

Originally Posted By: Geoff Hannis
There's nothing wrong with white coats per se. They are a traditional and universally recognised symbol for "doctor"!
It's more a sign of a lab technician these days. The only time I've had to wear a white coat is in pathology or public health.

Our dress code policy was written by our previous head of department and he had a thing about not wanting to look too much like IT, who have sweatshirts with organisation's logo and IT on them, thus it's shirt and tie.

Now the bare below the elbow campaign has come, we sometimes look smarter than the doctors! If anything now a days the traditional symbol for a doctor is a stethoscope draped around their shoulders.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 12:43 PM

Sounds like you've got a problem with the management mind-set there, too, Chris. That's one of the weirdest "reasons" for a particular dress code that I've ever heard (and I've heard a few)!

The stethoscope has always been part of the medic's symbolism, of course. But (as I may have mentioned before), it's not too hard to appear smarter than (young) NHS doctors these days, casually dressed as most of them are.

Don't forget, guys (as if you could), that there is a whole world of biomed outside of the British NHS. In general, out there in the wider world, doctors still wear white coats, believe me. smile
Posted By: D.O.A

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 3:17 PM

What is needed is a pair of chino's,safety shoe's and a shirt sleeve shirt with the NHS EBME stiched in...job done! The only people who need to know who you are will do by EBME. One idiot in management side we should wear scrubs as a uniform (Not for just theatre work!).
Obviously he still doesnt know the difference between a technician and clinical staff yet! Rant over!
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 3:49 PM

Again it depends on the setup! We wear scrubs here! Its very convenient!

Ed
Posted By: Huw

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 4:25 PM

Where you are Ed, there is a much warmer climate for one thing wink
Here, ebme buildings are not always in the main hospital building...
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 4:28 PM

Scrubs are OK (if you can get a size that fits), and are able to bung them into the hospital laundry every couple of days. But they look out of place in some departments (OPD, for example), so you are back to wearing a (blue) lab coat to cover them in those locations (the canteen is another one that immediately comes to mind)! Also, what footwear "go" with scrubs? Not sandals (flip-flops?), I hope! smile

Yes, Huw. Portakabins (with steps, naturally), plastic sheets to cover equipment (from the elements), duck-boards! A half-mile walk outside on the pavement (footpath, sidewalk) to the Dialysis Unit. Having to cross a (so-called minor) road to get from one half of the hospital to the other (with kit in tow). I have personally seen all of this ... and that's only this year!
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 5:04 PM

Yeah sorry! I grumble sometimes and totally forget where I come from; NHS-Ville,(Apologies)! We can wear any flat souled shoe (Including Trainers) but overshoes are always worn in the more critical areas! We also have to put on our CSI's for live theater etc oh and Snorkel/Mask and fins for renal!

Ed
Posted By: Chris Watts

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 05/06/08 5:11 PM

Originally Posted By: D.O.A
What is needed is a pair of chino's,safety shoe's and a shirt sleeve shirt with the NHS EBME stiched in...job done!
The dress code should be a shirt sleeve shirt without anything stiched in it! Before I came to the NHS the company I worked for decided to issue staff with a uniform with it's company logo on. Only problem is clothes wear out after a bit and start tooking a bit faded and you can guarantee they won't get replaced at a suitable interval.
Posted By: Kawasaki

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 06/06/08 7:18 AM

As mentioned by Chris Watts, all of the doctors (particularly the new junior ones) always wear a stethoscope draped round their neck like a badge of honour. A bit like a sign saying "I'm a doctor"!!!!
Why don't other Health Professionals follow their lead and then we could identify the technicians by the multimeter slung around their shoulders???!!!
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 06/06/08 7:57 AM

And the "Clinical Technologists" could wear their mortar boards on their heads? smile

PS: I usually go for the "small (mains-tester) screwdriver in the top pocket" look, myself.
Posted By: Eddie

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 06/06/08 8:45 AM

Yeah I used to have one of them Geoff until some smart ar$e decided to replace the neon with a 5 amp fuse! Oh so funny!

Ed
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 31/07/09 3:25 PM


A good friend has advised that, following a change of management at the (NHS) hospital where he works, ties and long-sleeved shirts, and wrist-watches even*, are "out" ... and open-necked, short-sleeved shirts are now very much "in"!

Another little victory, then, for those of us who have been advocating this for at least half a lifetime!

But, recalling how er, inflexible the previous management was on this issue, I can't help but wonder how "professional and well-presented" the blokes appear now! Perhaps it simply doesn't matter any more? Who knows! smile

* He didn't mention rings, bangles, copper wrist bands or facial "furniture" ... but, needless to say, my own policies would preclude all those as well!
Posted By: SUZUKI

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/08/09 10:55 AM

What about bikini's and shorts are they in as well?
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/08/09 11:04 AM


Don't tell me ... you're a Brüno fan!

As I have remarked on more than one occasion in the past, whatever is deemed de rigueur for young doctors and medical students should also be good enough for the likes of us. smile
Posted By: bcarlisle

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/08/09 11:40 AM

As I always say you can dress them up but if they know cock all whats the use of them. Just like we have here!!
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 03/08/09 11:46 AM


I assume you're referring to the casually dressed young medical students, there, Billy ... and not the biomed techs!

Dress them up? Dress them down more like! smile

You can usually make them out easily enough, though. They are the ones with semi-earnest expressions fixed on their faces, often found tottering about with folders clutched firmly to their er, breasts and stethoscopes dangling around their necks. And usually oblivious to what's going on around them, as they march (OK, sometimes they waddle) off to the canteen with some sort of "mobile device" pressed against their ear.

Posted By: Graham Roberts

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 9:21 AM

In Scotland, there has been a directive that those with patient contact do not wear ties (because they never get washed). I'd heard that our hospital is going over various colours of "blues" for the nurses, based on Sister/SN etc.
We don't wear ties anymore, but I still expect my staff to wear clean shirts, trousers and shoes.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 9:49 AM


In my experience, the best way around all this is to have the biomeds issued with a uniform, including footwear, and to provide laundry facilities on site (and that includes ironing)! smile

Once again, it's hardly Rocket Science, is it?
Posted By: Neil Porter

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 9:49 AM

You should try visiting here, there are people who don't wash their shirts (uniform) for days, and in this heat (phew!!!)deodarents are a luxury for these people.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 9:55 AM


There's nothing wrong with the taste of honest labour!

And isn't there some noble notion "out there" about paying the worker before the sweat on his forehead dries?

What's wrong with human odours ... it's the stuff of life?

It's only "conditioning" (that is, advertising) that has made people (in the West) ashamed of their own bodies, and goaded them into spending thousands each year on unnecessary frivolities like so-called "deodorants", tooth-paste and all the rest!

Personally, I avoid people who have been heavy-handed with "personal product" aerosols ... they usually make me sneeze, gag, retch ... or worse! Give me WD-40 any day!

The General Public are not known as the "Great Unwashed" for nothing, you now! smile
Posted By: Kawasaki

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 11:04 AM

Sorry, but there is nothing worse than a bad case of BO along with Halitosis!!!!
If someone can't be bothered to make a bit of effort with having a shower everyday then frankly they are either totally lazy or French!!??
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 11:11 AM


I hear what you're saying there, Kawa! But not everywhere in the world has access to water in abundance, remember.

And about the French ... what can I say but aucun commentaire! smile

PS: what about leg ulcers?
Posted By: Neil Porter

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 12:06 PM

No! they have a shower, but they put on yesterdays clothes, that's the problem. Enough BO to knock a plane out of the sky, honest labour I have no truck with, when a salesman with AC in his car turns up smelling like rotten eggs I draw the line.
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 04/08/09 12:09 PM


Hydrogen Sulphide? smile
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 29/07/19 9:43 AM


Ten years on ... folk are still telling stories about ties (mainly). smile

To be honest, I don't understand why tie-wearing folk (politicians et al) don't wear tie clips (just as I always used to do). It keeps them neatly in place, and if nothing else, stops the darned things dangling into places they shouldn't go; it also prevents them flying over your shoulder when running for the bus, pursuing miscreants, or what-have-you.
Posted By: John Sandham

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 16/08/19 3:25 PM

I still wear a tie (unless I am told not too) Its the rebel in me wink
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 18/08/19 12:35 PM


Best stay clear of machine tools then, John. Not to mention (secure) Mental Health Units. Or at least use clip-ons (see earlier post). smile
Posted By: John Sandham

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 19/08/19 9:41 AM

Ha ha. wink
I will heed your advice Geoff!
Posted By: DaveC in Oz

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 20/08/19 9:30 PM

and I would add, stress test treadmills to that list.......
Posted By: Geoff Hannis

Re: Hospital Dress Codes - 21/08/19 7:47 PM


... X-Ray Film Processors
... Serial Changers ("Spot Film Devices")
...Cassette Loaders (Unloaders)
...Film Changers?

...Rolling Mixers
...Centrifuges? think
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