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Posted By: Alan M Graseby 3100 Release Date - 20/08/13 9:50 AM
Hi Guys

Just a quick query to clear up a discussion amongst the guys here, when was the Graseby 3100 first released?

Im sure somebody out there will remember.

Many thanks

Regards

AlanM
Posted By: Geoff Hannis Re: Graseby 3100 Release Date - 20/08/13 10:02 AM

I don't have "chapter and verse", Alan, but I would go for 1992.

For sure, it featured in "Evn 149", which was published in February 1993 (where it was cited as costing 1,035).

For what it's worth (and as we all know) it was developed from the 3000, but was far superior electronically (and included a battery)! I would say that the 3000 (which was itself designed as a low-cost alternative to the MS-2000 - which was circa 1985, I would say) was introduced in 1990 (or maybe a year earlier). smile
Posted By: RoJo Re: Graseby 3100 Release Date - 21/08/13 10:45 AM
While we are reminicing what about the Vickers IP4 and IP5 and the wonderful clockwork Handley pump.
Which was the first syringe pump in common use?
Robert
Posted By: Geoff Hannis Re: Graseby 3100 Release Date - 21/08/13 10:49 AM

Straight off the top of my head:- how about the Treonic? smile

Meanwhile, Robert ... how about *this for your next syringe pump project? think

* "Not for Clinical Use on Humans"!
Posted By: RoJo Re: Graseby 3100 Release Date - 21/08/13 12:59 PM
I think most modern pumps can be controlled from a computer, it is just that the powers that be do not allow it. Would you like to guarantee the software was 100% bug free.
We found a bug in the IVAC 770 software, if you used the drug calculator and put in a certain combination of patient weight and drug concentration it got the maths wrong.
Perhaps it had one of the original Pentium processors in it.
Robert
Posted By: Geoff Hannis Re: Graseby 3100 Release Date - 21/08/13 1:47 PM

That should be just a simple formula, surely? So if it worked for one set of values, it should have worked for all.

Maybe they used a look-up table (that contained an error) ... or maybe the program didn't trap daft (that is, invalid) inputs.

Software that is 100% bug-free? If we expand the definition of "bug" to include failing to trap "unexpected" inputs, or "unusual" operation by the user, I doubt that any exists.

BTW: all modern pumps (and most other kit these days) is already controlled by software. Internally, at least. smile
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