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Joined: May 2008
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Sage
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Sage
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Posts: 428
I guess there are two things the auditor will look up for:

1) Periodic IPM records of the device;
2) Calibration records of your analyzer rather than the defibrillator.

Defibrillators are seldom calibrated but rather they are verified for their accuracy and performance.


Cheers!


Make the impossible POSSIBLE. I know we all can and it is the wisdom to distinguish one from the other.

My blog: http://biomedicalengineeringconsultancy.blogspot.sg/

Joined: Aug 2009
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Scholar
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Scholar
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Posts: 66
HI

Following on from the advice given above - when we encounter a 'new' device (any item of Biomedical equipment) and we need to write/review our test procedure, we revert to the simple question of what does the equipment do? And then monitor/measure appropriate parameters around those functions.

So for your defibs:-
All following tests on battery power:-
Max power output (record measured versus set power - are within tolerence?)
If you wish, also record volts and amps at max power.
It is a good idea to scope the waveform (nice smooth rise and falls)
If its an AED - it will charge on vfib and no shock advised on normal sinus rythm
If AED - the first, second, third shock are power stepping (or not as according to your resus council guide lines)
Charge time to max (within spec's)
Sync - that it can and within tolerance for peak and base
If it has a printer - that the printer works properly (good idea to add printout of test firing to your records)
We used to record every power setting delivered energy on older dial gauge defibs (LP9 etc) but with 'digital' defibs that change power setting by 1J steps this could be time consuming - we take a three or four power settings down the power scale and ensure what set is what is delivered - with special attention to 10joules and less
ECG trace - with power set to zero - short both paddles together and shake the cables - there will be noise and just a wobble on the bas line according to the cables bounce.
Then set the paddles on the tester and measure a known rythm and compare what is set to what is measured - then do the same with the lead set.
Finally, of course, electrical safety.

That summarises a basic defib test from my point of view - this of course does not include a pacing defib - for which we would add the pacing tests.

We use the Fluke defib tester (with pacing option) - so far I've not come across a defib it will not test.

Now for the cotiversy - Once you have the tester etc set up , it should only take 15mins to actually test a defib - so say say 30 mins total time per defib per test and We also have dropped our testing frequency down to every twelve months - remember that the users test the defib every week at least.


As very rule of thumb (guesss)- we would recommend about 1200 to 1500 items of Biomedical equipment per year. We have pushed this to about 1800 items per Biomed per year (but the Biomed does very little of anything else).

Hope this helps.

Regards

Phil

Last edited by Kiwi Phil; 21/06/13 12:02 AM.
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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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Just the one discharge at max energy? That's a test for wimps, Phil! LOL

And (just out of interest)... are you able to cite any manufacturer or "official body" who has sanctioned I/PM for in-service defibs at annual intervals?

I have always gone for 90 days, myself. frown

But yes:- "what does it do"? Then "test what it does" is a nice idea to bear in mind. As we know, some folk can get a bit carried away with testing kit to the nth.degree.


If you don't inspect ... don't expect.
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Super Hero
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Super Hero
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Originally Posted By: Kiwi Phil

As very rule of thumb (guesss)- we would recommend about 1200 to 1500 items of Biomedical equipment per year. We have pushed this to about 1800 items per Biomed per year (but the Biomed does very little of anything else).


You might want to flesh that out a bit, Phil.

Do you mean PM? What kit (defibs?); and how often? think

Or would I be right in reading that as:- "typical total number of equipment checked (PM'd?) per biomed per year"?

Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 39
Visionary
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Visionary
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Posts: 39
Defibrillators should be checked at least twice a year in my opinion, four times is better (I'd agree with Geoff), and a new battery every two years.

..but at the end of the day you do what the manufacturer says or local regulations recommend and you're covered.


Last edited by Paul Tregurtha; 21/06/13 11:33 PM.
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